The Odd Couple

This article on public lands grazing reform in Utah appeared in the February 14, 2014 issue of High Country News

If you had never heard them talk about one another, you might assume Mary O’Brien and Bill Hopkin were enemies.

Hopkin, a sturdy 68-year-old with a shock of white hair, grew up stringing fence and tending cows in conservative, pro-ranching northern Utah. Now the grazing management specialist for the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food, he says he’s still “at my best when I’m talking over the hood of a pickup.” Cattle, he fervently believes, can help rangelands thrive.

O’Brien, also 68, is elfish and unflinchingly direct, with a big laugh. She grew up in Los Angeles, devouring Willa Cather’s books and falling so in love with grasslands that she would later encourage ecology students to honor native plants by thinking of each as a person. Before joining the Grand Canyon Trust, she earned an anti-grazing reputation for arguing against introducing cows to areas formerly grazed by sheep in Hells Canyon, on the Idaho-Oregon border.

Last May, at Kanab’s Amazing Earthfest, O’Brien’s husband mentioned that they had been married for 45 years. “I am so sorry,” Hopkin cut in. But instead of spite, his tone revealed affection and respect developed working with O’Brien to improve public-lands grazing in Utah. More…

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